Between Darkness and Joy

Between Darkness and Joy

“Somewhere between the dark night and joy lies a place of simple peaceful loving kindness. A place where I rest and lean safely against myself for awhile; a place where I can be in the silence and hold a sacred space for myself; a place where I know and embrace the full spectrum of vulnerability without judging myself; a place where courage and compassion are not actions, but simply states of being; where self-forgiveness gives way to hope and self love.. an awakening. Here, I lift myself up and know again for the first time what is in my heart… my intentions… and my passions… And from this place I embrace my powers and manifest all that is mine to hold and all that is mine to share…” – c.Boykin

 

 

 

 

Clay Boykin - Mandala

Clay Boykin – Mandala

Related links:

Mandala
Holding Sacred Space
A Leap of Faith
Friendship
Faith, Hope and Love
Twelve Powers

 

 

 

Between Darkness and Joy

Rumi

Screen Shot 2016-03-12 at 6.06.54 PM“Your task is not to seek for love, but merely to seek and find all the barriers within yourself that you have built against it.” ― Rumi

“Out beyond ideas of wrongdoing
and rightdoing there is a field.
I’ll meet you there.
When the soul lies down in that grass
the world is too full to talk about.” ― Rumi

“The wound is the place where the Light enters you.” ― Rumi

“Stop acting so small. You are the universe in ecstatic motion.” ― Rumi

“What you seek is seeking you.” ― Rumi

Jalāl ad-Dīn Muhammad Rūmī, or more popularly in the English-speaking world simply as Rumi (30 September 1207 – 17 December 1273), was a 13th-century Persian poet, jurist, theologian, and Sufi mystic. Iranians, Turks, Afghans, Tajiks, and other Central Asian Muslims as well as the Muslims of South Asia have greatly appreciated his spiritual legacy in the past seven centuries. Rumi’s importance is considered to transcend national and ethnic borders. His poems have been widely translated into many of the world’s languages and transposed into various formats. In 2007, he was described as the “most popular poet in America.”

Rumi’s son and followers founded the Mevlevi branch of the Sufi Islamic tradition, spinning around and around and around and looking totally at peace while doing so. This ritual meditation is called sema, and here’s what it’s about, according to this website:

It is scientifically recognized that the fundamental condition of our existence is to revolve. There is no being or object which does not revolve, because all beings are comprised of revolving electrons, protons, and neutrons in atoms. Everything revolves, and the human being lives by means of the revolution of these particles, by the revolution of the blood in his body, and by the revolution of the stages of his life, by his coming from the earth and his returning to it.

However, all of these revolutions are natural and unconscious. But the human being possesses a mind and an intelligence which distinguishes him from other beings. Thus the whirling dervish or semazen, intentionally and consciously participates in the shared revolution of other beings.

 

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