The Magic of Believing – Claude M. Bristol

The Magic of Believing – Claude M. Bristol

Claude Bristol is a name not often heard these days, yet his message on the power of believing is timeless and draws on the teachings of Buddha, Jesus, Phineas P. Quimby, Mary Baker Eddy, Ralph Waldo Emerson, and others.

The Magic of Believing (1948) – Claude M Bristol

For a two year period, I was church editor of a large metropolitan newspaper, during which I came in close contact with clergymen and leaders of all sects and denominations, mind-healers, divine healers, Spiritualists, Christian Scientists, New Thoughters, Unity leaders, sun and idol worshipers – and, yes, even a few infidels and pagans…

I have read literally thousands of books on modern psychology, metaphysics, ancient magic, Voodoo, Yoga, Theosophy, Christian Science, Unity, Truth, New Thought, Coueism, and many others dealing with what I call “Mind Stuff,” as well as the philosophies and teachings of great masters of the past.

Much has been written and said about mystical powers, unknown forces, the occult, metaphysics (beyond science), mental physics, psychology (the science of mind), black and white magic, and many kindred subjects, causing most people to believe that they are in the field of the supernatural. Perhaps they are for some. But to me, the only inexplicable thing about these powers is that belief makes them work…

Claude Bristol was a hard-headed journalist for several years, including stints as a police reporter and as church editor of a large city newspaper. In this post, he met people from every denomination and sect and later read hundreds of books on psychology, religion, science, metaphysics and ancient magic. Gradually, Bristol began to see the ‘golden thread’ which runs through all religions and esoteric teachings: that belief itself has amazing powers.

Having spent years thinking about the power of thought, he had assumed others knew something about it too. He was wrong. Strangely, he found that most people go through life without realizing the effect that strong belief can have on reaching their goals – they leave their desires vague and so they get vague outcomes… (continued)

Complete audiobook:

The Magic of BelievingComplete book in PDF

More on Claude Bristol  – The Magic of Believing was written, he says, for ex-servicemen and women who would have to adjust to civilian life and try to prosper in it. It was published when he was in his 50’s and followed the success of a small book he published in 1932 entitled T.N.T. – It Rocks the Earth… (continued)

“It is paradoxical, yet true, to say, that the more we know, the more ignorant we become in the absolute sense, for it is only through enlightenment that we become conscious of our limitations. Precisely one of the most gratifying results of intellectual evolution is the continuous opening up of new and greater prospects.” – Nikola Tesla.

Best 30 Claude M. Bristol Quotes

 

 

 

Triangulation

Triangulation

Triangulation is a manipulation tactic where one person will not communicate directly with another person, instead of using a third person to relay communication to the second, thus forming a triangle. It is also a form of splitting in which one person manipulates a relationship between two parties by controlling communication between them.

Triangulation may manifest itself as a manipulative device to engineer rivalry between two people, known as divide and conquer or playing one (person) against another.

 

 

As a Man Thinketh – James Allen

As a Man Thinketh – James Allen

 

The age-old maxim: “As a man thinketh in his heart, so is he” might well be considered one of the “open” secrets of the universe.

Some might ask: why should it be considered an “open” secret?

The answer is that investigation would reveal that this maxim can be found expressed in many different forms, across virtually the whole sphere of religion and philosophy – a few examples are presented below:

“Let a man strive to purify his thoughts. What a man thinketh, that is he; this is the eternal mystery. Dwelling within his Self with thoughts serene, he will find imperishable happiness. Man becomes that on what he thinks.”
Upanishads

“All that we are is a result of what we have thought. The mind is everything. What we think, we become.”
– Buddha

“Your disposition will be suitable to that which you think most frequently on; for the soul is, as it were, tinged with the colour and complexion of its own thoughts …Your life is what your thoughts make it.”
– Marcus Aurelius

“There is nothing either good or bad, but thinking makes it so.”
– William Shakespeare

“I think – therefore, I am.”
– Rene Descartes

“A man is what he thinks all day long.”
Ralph Waldo Emerson

“We become what we think about.”
– Earl Nightingale

“Thoughts are Things.”
– Prentice Mulford

james-allen-messenger-portrait

“As a man thinketh in his heart so is he.” – James Allen

“As a Man Thinketh” – Full audio book free on Youtube.

And, lest we forget, aside from the widely-recognized form of expression (Proverbs 23:7), the Bible also contains another form of expression, which nonetheless conveys the same message:

“My son, keep diligence upon thy heart, for out of it poureth forth all the issues of life.” (in King James English)

“Be careful how you think – your life is shaped by your thoughts” (in modern-day English)

– Proverbs 4:23

Source: METAPHYSICAL REVELATIONS

 

2018 Parliament of World Religions

2018 Parliament of World Religions

I hope to have the opportunity to meet you at this year’s Parliament of the World’s Religions. It was created to cultivate harmony among the world’s religious and spiritual communities and foster their engagement with the world and its guiding institutions in order to achieve a just, peaceful and sustainable world.

This will be the seventh gathering since the first one was held in Chicago in 1893 when Swami Vivekanada made his famous talk introducing the Hindu religious tradition to the West.

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The Parliament of the World’s Religions seeks to promote interreligious harmony, rather than unity. The problem with seeking unity among religions is the risk of loss of the unique and precious character of each individual religious and spiritual tradition; this understanding is key to our framework.

Interreligious harmony, on the other hand, is an attainable and highly desirable goal. Such an approach respects, and is enriched by, the particularities of each tradition. Moreover, within each tradition are the resources (philosophical, theological and spiritual teachings and perspectives) that enable each to enter into respectful, appreciative and cooperative relationships with persons and communities of other traditions. (Source: Parliament of the World’s Religions website)